A commentary on the Book of Psalms: in which their literal or historical sense, as they relate to King David, and the people of Israel, is illustrated, and their application to Messiah, to the church, and to individuals, as members thereof, is pointed out, with a view to render the use of the Psalter pleasing and profitable to all orders and degrees of Christians

By: George Horne

Price: $49.95

Quantity: 1 available

Book Condition: Used - Good


1/4 leather w/marbled boards. Cover and leather are worn. No marks or writing observed in text. (1827 binscription on end paper.) Binding tight and square.Foxing mostly on endpapers through title page. . . . . . . . . . . . George Horne (1 November 1730 – 17 January 1792) was an English churchman, academic, writer, and university administrator. Through his preaching, journalism, correspondence and authorship of numerous works (some at the time anonymous), Horne actively defended the high church tendency in Anglicanism against Calvinism, the Church of England against other denominations, and Trinitarian Christianity against other beliefs. He had a reputation as a preacher, and his sermons were frequently reprinted. In his polemical pieces, some appearing in newspapers under the name of Nathaniel Freebody (a cousin who had died), he was influenced by the work of Charles Leslie[1] Having early adopted some of the views of John Hutchinson, he wrote in his defence, though disagreeing with Hutchinson's fanciful interpretations of Hebrew etymology. He also fell under the imputation of Methodism, but protested from the university pulpit against those who took their theology from George Whitefield and John Wesley rather than major Anglican divines. Nevertheless, he disapproved of the expulsion of six Methodist students from St Edmund Hall, Oxford, a high-profile event of 1768 in Oxford;[6] and later, when bishop, thought Wesley should not be forbidden to preach in his diocese. Ordained priest in 1753, from 1760 to 1764 he was curate of the Oxfordshire village of Horspath.[5] Thereafter his religious duties were performed at Magdalen until 1771, when the prime minister Lord North appointed him to the Royal Household as chaplain in ordinary to King George III, a position he held until 1781.[1] In that year, he was appointed Dean of Canterbury, combining the post with the presidency of Magdalen. An energetic dean, he promoted Sunday schools to inform the young and delivered influential sermons against Unitarianism. He was also an active supporter of the Naval and Military Bible Society, now the Naval Military & Air Force Bible Society, founded in 1779 to supply Christian literature to the armed services and seafarers. In 1790, by then in ill health from which he never recovered, with some reluctance he accepted the bishopric of Norwich, resigning from Canterbury and, the next year, from Magdalen. Unable to accomplish much in his diocese or in the House of Lords, one achievement was to support the bishops of the Episcopalian Church of Scotland who in 1789 came to London to petition Parliament for relief from their legal disadvantages. In what became his final circular to his diocesan clergy, as the French Revolution challenged most of the values for which he stood, he remained adamant that 'true religion and true learning were never yet at variance'

Title: A commentary on the Book of Psalms: in which their literal or historical sense, as they relate to King David, and the people of Israel, is illustrated, and their application to Messiah, to the church, and to individuals, as members thereof, is pointed out, with a view to render the use of the Psalter pleasing and profitable to all orders and degrees of Christians

Author Name: George Horne

Categories: Bible Study,

Publisher: Alexander Tower: 1822

ISBN Number: B0008572CQ

Size: Leather

Book Condition: Used - Good

Seller ID: 58437